New York City Council Header
Meeting Name: Committee on Consumer Affairs and Business Licensing Agenda status: Final
Meeting date/time: 9/15/2021 3:00 PM Minutes status: Final  
Meeting location: REMOTE HEARING (VIRTUAL ROOM 4)
Published agenda: Agenda Agenda Published minutes: Minutes Minutes  
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Int 0499-2018 *Karen Koslowitz  Allowing corporations, partnerships and other business entities to obtain newsstand licenses.IntroductionThis bill expands the eligibility requirements for a newsstand license to allow partnerships, corporations and other business entities to obtain a license. The bill maintains the limit of two licenses per entity, but creates deeming provisions to help ensure that individuals do not use corporate or other business entities to exceed the license limit.Hearing Held by Committee  Action details Not available
Int 0499-2018 *Karen Koslowitz  Allowing corporations, partnerships and other business entities to obtain newsstand licenses.IntroductionThis bill expands the eligibility requirements for a newsstand license to allow partnerships, corporations and other business entities to obtain a license. The bill maintains the limit of two licenses per entity, but creates deeming provisions to help ensure that individuals do not use corporate or other business entities to exceed the license limit.Laid Over by Committee  Action details Not available
Int 0508-2018 *Helen K. Rosenthal  Requiring low-wage workers to enter into covenants not to compete and also to require employers to notify potential employees of any requirement to enter into a covenant not to compete.IntroductionEmployers are increasingly requiring their employees to sign non-compete agreements as a condition of employment, even in low-wage jobs where such provisions do not serve an obvious purpose. These covenants can lead to low-wage employees being unreasonably restricted in finding new jobs. This bill would prohibit employers from requiring low-wage employees to enter into covenants not to compete as a condition of their employment.Hearing Held by Committee  Action details Not available
Int 0508-2018 *Helen K. Rosenthal  Requiring low-wage workers to enter into covenants not to compete and also to require employers to notify potential employees of any requirement to enter into a covenant not to compete.IntroductionEmployers are increasingly requiring their employees to sign non-compete agreements as a condition of employment, even in low-wage jobs where such provisions do not serve an obvious purpose. These covenants can lead to low-wage employees being unreasonably restricted in finding new jobs. This bill would prohibit employers from requiring low-wage employees to enter into covenants not to compete as a condition of their employment.Laid Over by Committee  Action details Not available
Int 0974-2018 *Helen K. Rosenthal  Disclosure in employment advertisements of mandatory arbitration and non-disparagement clauses in employment contracts.IntroductionMany employers require their employees to sign contracts that include mandatory arbitration clauses and non-disparagement clauses. This bill would require employment advertisements to disclose if the person hired will have to sign an employment contract with either an arbitration or non-disparagement clause.Hearing Held by Committee  Action details Not available
Int 0974-2018 *Helen K. Rosenthal  Disclosure in employment advertisements of mandatory arbitration and non-disparagement clauses in employment contracts.IntroductionMany employers require their employees to sign contracts that include mandatory arbitration clauses and non-disparagement clauses. This bill would require employment advertisements to disclose if the person hired will have to sign an employment contract with either an arbitration or non-disparagement clause.Laid Over by Committee  Action details Not available
Int 2318-2021 *Diana Ayala   Licensing of labor service providers.IntroductionThis bill would require businesses who temporarily supply their employees to clients for the performance of manual labor, such as construction work, to be licensed. These businesses would be required to provide their employees with a summary of their rights under city, state and federal employment laws and with information on their next work assignment at least 24 hours prior to beginning work. The businesses would additionally have to disclose data on their company, workforce, worksites, and workers’ compensation and unemployment insurance information to the Department of Consumer and Worker Protection twice per year. That information would be supplied to the Council and the Mayor yearly, and published on the Department’s website. The bill would also make it unlawful for clients of these businesses to contract with them if such businesses are unlicensed. Employees who avail themselves of their rights under this bill would be protected against retaliation. Violations of the bill could result in license suspension and revocation, civil penalties and other enforcement actions ordered by a court. Employees of the businesses would be able to initiate a private right of action against their employers for violations of the bill.Hearing Held by Committee  Action details Not available
Int 2318-2021 *Diana Ayala   Licensing of labor service providers.IntroductionThis bill would require businesses who temporarily supply their employees to clients for the performance of manual labor, such as construction work, to be licensed. These businesses would be required to provide their employees with a summary of their rights under city, state and federal employment laws and with information on their next work assignment at least 24 hours prior to beginning work. The businesses would additionally have to disclose data on their company, workforce, worksites, and workers’ compensation and unemployment insurance information to the Department of Consumer and Worker Protection twice per year. That information would be supplied to the Council and the Mayor yearly, and published on the Department’s website. The bill would also make it unlawful for clients of these businesses to contract with them if such businesses are unlicensed. Employees who avail themselves of their rights under this bill would be protected against retaliation. Violations of the bill could result in license suspension and revocation, civil penalties and other enforcement actions ordered by a court. Employees of the businesses would be able to initiate a private right of action against their employers for violations of the bill.Laid Over by Committee  Action details Not available
Int 2397-2021 *Francisco P. Moya  Severance pay for hotel service employees.IntroductionThe bill would require severance pay for hotel service employees in the event of: 1) the closure of a hotel to the public, provided that the hotel has not, by October 11, 2021, recalled at least 25% of employees and reopened to the public by November 1, 2021; or 2) a mass layoff of at least 75% of employees. Employees eligible for severance pay would be owed $500 per week, for up to 30 weeks. This requirement would not apply to a hotel that has closed permanently and has or is in the process of converting to an alternate use, provided that employees are offered severance of at least 20 days pay per year of service and provided that the severance is specifically tied to the conversion. The obligation to provide severance would end when an employee is recalled, or, for a closed hotel, when the hotel reopens to the public and recalls 25% of employees.Hearing Held by Committee  Action details Not available
Int 2397-2021 *Francisco P. Moya  Severance pay for hotel service employees.IntroductionThe bill would require severance pay for hotel service employees in the event of: 1) the closure of a hotel to the public, provided that the hotel has not, by October 11, 2021, recalled at least 25% of employees and reopened to the public by November 1, 2021; or 2) a mass layoff of at least 75% of employees. Employees eligible for severance pay would be owed $500 per week, for up to 30 weeks. This requirement would not apply to a hotel that has closed permanently and has or is in the process of converting to an alternate use, provided that employees are offered severance of at least 20 days pay per year of service and provided that the severance is specifically tied to the conversion. The obligation to provide severance would end when an employee is recalled, or, for a closed hotel, when the hotel reopens to the public and recalls 25% of employees.Laid Over by Committee  Action details Not available